1/31/15

Tom Brennan - Majoring on the Minors: Top 30 Prospects - #6 Matt Reynolds

7 comments
MAJORING ON THE MINORS: TOP 30 PROSPECTS – #6 MATT REYNOLDS – Tom Brennan

I’m doing my Top 30 Prospects articles a bit differently – in 2 lists:
·       A top 10 list of lower minors guys who likely won’t show up until 2017 or later.  See list at end of this article.

·       Followed by my top 20 list of guys who are closing in on the big leagues.  Guys who could help in the near future or be trade bait.

Here is the list so far:
20.   Daniel Muno
19.   Michael Fulmer
18.   Miller Diaz
17.   Dario Alvarez
16.   Jayce Boyd
15.   Rob Whalen
14.   Hansel Robles
13.   Gabriel Ynoa
12.   Gavin Cecchini
11.   Jack Leathersich
10.   Cory Mazzoni
9.      Cesar Puello
8.      Matt Bowman
7.      Akeel Morris

Today, let’s ponder LIPA, LILCO, Con Edison, National Grid.  At the start of 2014, coming off a mid .220's season in 2013 in St Lucie, most folks were down on 2nd round 2012 pick MATT REYNOLDS.  Had him pegged as a utility infielder, at best.  Me too.  But as 2014 began in AA, he did 3 things well, in no specific order: hit, hit, and hit.

When he scorched coming out of the 2014 gate, I started advocating early on for a quick Reynolds jump to AAA.  After 55 games, a .355 average and a.430 on base % in AA, I got my wish and off he went to AAA.  

Surely, he'd sputter at least a bit there, right?  Uhh, no, unless you consider 68 games in AAA hitting .333, with a .385 on base %, as sputtering.

And to all those who were saying, he hit a powerless .355 in AA, where's the pop, how about 25 extra base hits in AAA. 

Eight or nine homers after late July, between AAA and winter ball, showing the 6'1", 200 righty hitter has some emerging pop and could be a 10-15 HR guy.  A .300 major league hitter?  Why not?

20 steals in 27 attempts show there is a bit of giddyup in the lad's gait.  Still looking for flaws, folks.

Maybe the defense is flawed.  80% of his 2014 games at SS, the rest at 2B, and 17 errors.  OK, not Rey Ordonez in the field, but progress in his defensive game over 2013, and not so bad, actually. Maybe he'll be slightly above average defensively when all is said and done.  I still don’t see a real flaw.

In summary, I like the guy.  Too quick with that utility player label, everyone.  Maybe he is a Daniel Murphy with better D.  I'd take that.  Or trade him for something real good during or after 2015.

What does he have that Troy Tulowitzki does not?  How about healthy, younger hips?

He'll show up in Citi this year if healthy.  I look forward to it.  He is going to prove to be far better than Ruben Tejada.  Yes, I look forward to Matt joining the roster in Queens soon.


MY TOP 10 LOWER MINORS LIST:
# 1 - Marcos Molina

#2 – Michael Conforto

#3 – Amed Rosario

#4 – Dominic Smith

#5 - Jhoan Urena

#6 – Vicente Lupo

#7 – Wuilmer Becerra

#8 – Luis Guillorme

#9 - Casey Meisner

#10 - Milton Ramos
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Mack - 2015 Prospect List - #6 – C – Kevin Plawecki

5 comments


My rankings is solely subjective and based on nothing more than what is in my head at time I’m writing this. I’ve followed the Mets minor league players for many years and I feel I can recognize talent at various levels of their development. What I have failed at is how to determine when this talent seems to diminish. It’s amazing how many first round picks never make it in this game.

I’m old school, so you won’t seem much SABR-discussion here, I do research and, when I find a good quote or two, I’ll add them to my analysis, but, like I said in the beginning of this post, most of this us subjective.

Let’s get started.

#6 –  C – Kevin Plawecki – 23/yrs old – 6-2, 225 – R/R

           Compensation A pick in 2012 – 35th pick overall

           (left on board – Joey Gallo (39th pick) – AA/A+:  42-HR, 106-RBI)

           2012 – Brklyn – 216-AB, .250/.345/.384/729, 7-HR, 27-RBI

           2013 – Sav/St.Lucie – 449-AB - .305/.390/.448/838, 8-HR, 80-RBI

           2014 – B-Mets/Vegas – 376-AB - .309/.365/.460/825, 11-HR, 64-RBI


What did they say about Plawecki on draft day –

           BA-New York (NL): Kevin Plawecki, c, Purdue: Physical college receiver with fringy to average tools across the board. 

Kevin Goldstein ‏@Kevin_Goldstein - It's not a draft without the Mets over-drafting a college catcher
Baseball America him ranked as the 67th player eligible for the draft.
MLB.com had him ranked 74th.

AA - In a lot of ways, Plawecki is a pick in a similar vein to Gavin Cecchini. They're both guys with contact bats and a good chance to stick at a premium defensive position. You can't find those guys. But while I understood the Cecchini pick, this is more of a headscratcher for me. I have more questions about Plawecki in general. As a defender, he does a lot of things right, but his throwing can be problematic. As an offensive player, he's even more one-dimensional than Cecchini. And he's not as young, so he has less time to learn. I just feel that Plawecki was neither the best player available and that there would be other opportunities to draft catchers nearly as good later on.

Keith Law - Plawecki is the best prospect on a Purdue squad that won the Big 10 title for the first time in 103 years and hosted an NCAA regional for the first time as well. He's a fringy defensive catcher who's better at the mental aspects of the position than the physical aspects, but whose ability to make contact should help him become an above-average hitter for the position. He has a largely linear swing, and while he keeps his weight back well he doesn't use it to drive the ball, instead making a lot of gap-to-gap contact; his swing can get long, which is particularly damaging due to his lack of power, and he'll need to keep it consistently shorter in pro ball. Behind the plate, his receiving is average but his arm is below-average, just not enough to force him off the position. He has an everyday catcher ceiling because of makeup and scarcity at the position he plays.
MLB.com - “Plawecki is an offensive catcher with a lot of ability with the bat. He makes consistent contact with a short swing that allows him to stay in the center of the field. With a contact first approach, Plawecki’s power is fringy right now, but there’s a lot of strength to potentially tap into in the future. While his arm is fringe average, at best, the other parts of his defensive game are more than fine to stay behind the plate. He works with pitchers well, calling his own game. He has good hands, frames pitches and blocks them well. He has the size and body frame you want from a catcher.”


Sure, he’s not the best defensive catcher in baseball, but he has a special bat that seems to getting better each year he’s in pro ball. And, the Mets were obviously not afraid to move the college boy faster than you would ever see with someone at the high school level.

The Mets have drafted some college catcher clunkers in the past, but the first rule of drafting catchers is to stay away from the high school kids. The majority of them do not stick at this position, and they can work out their aches and pains while playing behind the batter in college.


Outlook –


Plawecki is going to be a major league catcher. He will first return to Las Vegas and probably play their until the 2015 all-star break. I’d like to think the Mets would keep him, promote him to Queens, and make him Travis d’Arnaud’s backup… but because of the scarcity of talented catchers in the game, he’s probably going to find himself traded some day for a major prospect chip.


I like him a lot.
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Reese Kaplan - Catching the Marlins

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There’s been a lot written lately about the Mets vs. the Marlins in terms of who has had the better off season and who is better positioned for the future.  Let’s take a position by position look at the two teams and see where they stand.

First Base
Here you have the up and down production of Michael Morse vs. the one year numbers of Lucas Duda.  Throughout his career Morse has had problems staying healthy and he’s in the Michael Jackson school of defense – wearing a glove on one hand for no apparent reason.  He’s worn a lot of uniforms throughout his career and in 2015 will suit up for the Marlins for the first time.  His best year was 2011 with the Nationals when he hit 31 HRs, drove in 95 and batted .303.  While the batting average is better, that’s about what Lucas Duda did in fewer ABs for the Mets last year with no protection in the batting order.  Yes, everyone would like to see Duda be more productive against left handed pitching but the edge clearly seems to be on his side since Morse has never been able to replicate those numbers and (surprisingly) Lucas Duda provides superior defense.   The Mets have the better player.

Second Base
A lot of people felt the former shortstop Dee Gordon finally put it all together last year when he made an All-Star appearance, stole 64 bases and batted .289.  It makes you wonder then why the Dodgers were so willing to push him out the door?  For a slap hitter with no power (2 HRs, 32 RBIs) he still managed to whiff over 100 times.  At the time it was considered an odd trade considering Dan Haren has threatened retirement since he wants to finish his career on the west coast.  The pivotal figure in the deal – stud LHP prospect Andrew Heaney – was then flipped to the Angels to bring Howie Kendrick across town to the Dodgers to replace Gordon.   Gordon’s breakthrough produced a 2.3 WAR performance whereas Kendrick in an off-year produced 5.2 WAR.  The thinking is probably that Gordon can add to his league leading triples total utilizing the home ballpark’s dimensions to his advantage.  Still, most feel the Dodgers upgraded the position.  The Mets, meanwhile, have steady Daniel Murphy playing in what’s likely his final year in Queens.  Murphy produced the same .289 average as Gordon, but with more power and RBIs (and fewer steals).  Neither will make anyone forget Doug Flynn’s glove, but considering Murphy has done the same year in and year out whereas Gordon slumped dramatically in the second half and has never put together enough offense to start regularly prior to 2014, I’d give a slight edge to the Mets. 

Shortstop
Adeiny Hecchavarria is no gold glover.  He’s not a speed demon.  He doesn’t hit for power and doesn’t drive in runs.  The first two statements are also true of Wilmer Flores, but he will likely outhit his Florida counterpart by a considerable margin.  The Mets have the clear edge here, too. 

Third Base
After a solid year from Japan-reborn Casey McGehee, the Marlins scored a coup when they obtained professional hitter Martin Prado from the Yankees to take over at 3B.  Prado has been quite versatile around the diamond throughout his career and his bat is Murphy-like.  In a typical year he’ll net you 13 HRs, 70 RBIs and a .291 average.  Now those numbers are certainly respectable and far superior to what David Wright provided in another injury-plagued year in 2015.  However, if Wright is healthy then he is a sure bet to double the power output and be a decidedly superior player. 

Catcher
While Jarrod Saltalamacchia has never quite lived up to the hype as the next great catching prospect, he’s not going to hurt the team defensively nor offensively.  Although he’s hit as many as 25 HRs in a season, last year it was a more modest 11/44/.220 offensive production for the Marlins.  Travis d’Arnaud is in the same position now that Salty was earlier in his career.  During 2015 it was a tale of two players, the pre-demotion d’Arnaud and the middle-of-the-order type bat he provided upon his return.  The final tally of 13/41/.240 was not markedly better, but the period after returning to Queens from Las Vegas suggests the potential is most assuredly there for more.  Slight edge to the Mets. 

Left Field
While it’s not been carved in stone, the assumption is that Curtis Granderson will shift to left this year to help make up for his weak arm.  His season in 2015 is well known – far below what the Mets were hoping he’d produce – whereas the Marlins’ Christian Yelich looks to be an impressive young hitter who provided them with 9/57/.284 as well as 21 SBs.  Given Granderson’s high propensity to strike out and his age, there could be a slight edge here to the Marlins.  However, given a 2nd year in the NL and reuniting with his former Yankee hitting coach it's possible three-time All Star Granderson could build on the 20 HRs and 66 RBIs he provided in 2014, particularly when you consider he spent a large chunk of the year in the leadoff position.  For now I'll call it a push (though the Marlins are certainly getting better value for their dollars). 

Center Field
Marcell Ozuna is one of the most exciting young players in baseball.  He has great defensive instincts, a cannon of an arm and a potentially lethal bat as well.  This past year he slashed 23/85/.269.  Now Juan Lagares is the reigning Gold Glove centerfielder and exists almost on another plane entirely with the glove and his arm.  However, his offensive contributions, though better in 2014 than in 2013, still pale next to Ozuna.  Big edge Marlins. 

Right Field
What Mets fans were hoping during the off-season was that they could acquire a player to provide the kind of offense Giancarlo Stanton has done for the Marlins – 37/105/.288.  Instead they got Michael Cuddyer.  He’ll likely hit .288 but not produce nearly the same run production.  Huge edge to the Marlins. 

Starting Rotation
The Marlins get a lot of accolades for their rotation but there are also some major question marks.   No one denies the quality Jose Fernandez brings to the team, but his timetable for return and his effectiveness post TJS is open to debate.  Henderson Alvarez stepped his game dramatically last year and it will be interesting to see if the can build on his 2.65 ERA success.  Cincinnati transplant Mat Latos is a flyball pitcher who’s had good success in a bandbox.  He should only get better in his new spacious stadium.  After these top three pitchers, however, it gets a little murky.  Jared Cosart is a little too hittable and doesn’t have terrific control, but he put up better than league average numbers.  There’s still no official word on Dan Haren and there may be a need to use one of the previously tried starters like Brad Hand or Dan Phelps who have performed below replacement level. 

On the Mets side of the ledger you have a similar issue with Matt Harvey, though he has a bit of a head start in his recovery.  No one will know for sure, but all signs point to him being ready for Opening Day (though the prudent choice may be to hold him in the warmer Florida weather for a few weeks).  After that you have Zack Wheeler whose second half was sensational.  Yes, he needs to cut down on the walks and to work deeper into games, but his 3.04 ERA in the latter part of the year was indicative of the talent he brings to the table.  Rookie of the Year Jacob de Grom seemed to get better as the season progressed and hopefully can build on his 2014 season with a 3:1 strikeout to walk ratio, better than a strikeout per inning pitched and a 2.69 ERA.  Bartolo Colon gave the Mets innings last year to fill in for the injured Matt Harvey and except for a few bad starts here and there usually kept the team right in the game..  His overall numbers were not that great, but he’s got some awards under his belt and appears to still have something left in the tank.  Jon Niese needs to stay healthy for a full season, but his 3.40 ERA and 3:1 strikeout to walk ratio suggest he’s in the upper half of pitchers in the league.  Behind them the Mets have great depth with Dillon Gee, Rafael Montero, Noah Syndergaard and Steve Matz all available to them should injuries arise.  I’d give the edge to the Mets staff as there are fewer questions and much more depth. 

Bullpen
The Marlins closer Steve Cishek is one of those under-the-radar type guys who doesn’t get the accolades he probably deserves, but if you look at his numbers you can’t deny his success.  He followed a 2013 campaign with 34 saves with a 2015 campaign of 39 saves.  His ERA jumped a bit to 3.17 but he still held batters to a .237 average.  Behind him you have an assortment of competent relievers such as Mike Dunn, A.J. Ramos, Aaron Crowe and Bryan Morris.  Ramos has had the most impressive numbers of the bunch. 

The Mets have a pretty formidable bullpen themselves with the surprising Jenrry Mejia, TJS recuperating Bobby Parnell, Vic Black, Jeurys Familia and Josh Edgin.  A lot hinges on Parnell’s recovery.  Without him in the mix I’d probably call it a slight edge to the Mets.  However, if Parnell is back by June then I think they have a shutdown bullpen that would measure up against the best in the game. 


Now anyone who knows me or who has read my column knows I’m the doom & gloom king when it comes to the outlook for the Mets.  However, despite two significant edges for the Marlins in Stanton and Ozuna who could combine for 70 HRs, the Mets seem to win just nearly every other area on the diamond.  I think the Mets  are clearly the 2nd best in the NL East, though still far behind what the Washington Nationals have to offer.    
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The Morning Report – 1-31 – Roy Campanella, Phillies, David Wright, Yoan Moncada, Jay Horwitz

15 comments


Remember… this is one of those special Saturday and Sunday morning posts that I’m just trying to find something and interesting under the subject of baseball related written material, all down while the Mets continue to sit on their hands.

There are 109 catchers since 1900 who have played 1,000 or more games at the position. The overall Defensive Winning Percentage of those 109 catchers, at catcher, is .681 points above the overall Defensive Winning Percentage of catchers, .659. This happens, of course, because good defensive catchers have longer careers at catcher than poor defensive catchers. 
The mean Winning Percentage for the 109 1,000-game catchers is .681, with a Standard Deviation of .070.  There are two catchers in history who are 2 standard deviations above the norm, and there are two catchers who are 2 standard deviations below the norm. Above the norm:  Roy Campanella and Yadier Molina. Below the norm: Frankie (Blimp) Hayes and Ernie Lombardi. - http://www.foxsports.com/mlb/just-a-bit-outside/baseball-joe/blog/bill-james-on-fielding-part-7-012915


Mack – ‘Campy’ was involved in his infamous automobile accident a month before I was going to turn 12 years old. He left the liquor store he owned in Harlem and begun the trip to his Glen Cove home, when he hit a patch of ice doing around 30 miles per hour. The car skidded, overturned, and broke his neck. I remember the day like it was yesterday, not only for the huge loss it created in the Dodger lineup, but also because the duties of catcher were turned over to probably the slowest person that ever played the game, Rube Walker. Walker turned over the catching duties in 1958 to Joe Pignatano (1962 Mets: .232, 56-AB), and a second year ex-sub named Johnny Roseboro.

NJ.com –

The Phillies, by their own admission, have no designs on competing for at least two or more seasons as the organization undergoes a massive top-to-bottom rebuild over the next several years.
With that in mind, it isn't all that shocking that Baseball Prospectus, as part of it's annual PECOTA Projections predicts that the Phillies will finish with the lowest win total in the Major Leagues in 2015. Nate Silver created the Sabermetrics system that predicts the Phillies will finish with a 69-93 record behind the Washington Nationals, New York Mets, Miami Marlins and Atlanta Braves in the National League East Division standings.  -  http://www.nj.com/phillies/index.ssf/2015/01/will_the_phillies_have_the_worst_record_in_basebal.html

Mack – You can’t sit on your hands like the Phillies have done the past few seasons.

I wrote recently about the possibility of a Mets team that was entirely homegrown. This was a pipe dream and just designed to generate a reaction (like many of the things I write).
No team is going to click on producing eight excellent starters in the field plus a full rotation. It takes draft picks, international signings, free agents, and trades, and you have to make sure you turn your team over before hair grows on them and everything turns to shit.

This is a team that just traded away their best two hitters (Jimmy Rollins, Marlon Byrd) and has one of the lowest rated farm systems in the league. And I haven’t even said anything about the average age of what’s left on this team.

Don’t worry about this team.

Just root for them to beat the Nats everytime they play them.


Comment From Snarfle - Yeah, speaking of the Mets ownership, do you think Sandy isn’t spending more because he doesn’t want to overpay, or because the Wilpons are saying he can have 80…maybe 82 million.

Eno Sarris: I think it’s the owners.

Comment From Bubba - What are you expecting from David Wright this year?

Eno Sarris: .280/18

          Mack – Frankly, I would be thrilled if Wright hit .280, but the important thing here is the number of at-bats he has for the season. Make this 500 and I’m dancing in the halls.

          18 home runs seems a little light, but that’s fine. I truly believe that five starters will finish the season with at least this many home runs (Wright, Cuddyer, Duda, d’Arnauld, Granderson).

          As for the comments on the Wilpons, you can’t stop what people ask you and this is one of the subjects we have covered over and over so I’m just going to move on. It’s not like they are going to sell the team to a group headed by Mark Cuban, Jerry Seinfeld, and Keith Hernandez, right?


Bleacher Nation -

The latest update comes from Ben Badler, who set off many of the revelations of the past week when he reported that the reason Yoan Moncada isn’t cleared yet is because MLB is demanding he get a specific license from the Office of Foreign Assets (“OFAC”), rather than the general license that he already has (this is reportedly an MLB policy that may not be required by the U.S. Government). Read Badler’s piece for the particulars, but the gist is that Badler confirmed with a U.S. official that OFAC does still issue those specific licenses, but, since they aren’t required under current U.S./Cuba relations, it doesn’t sound very typical with respect to Cubans. Further, because specific licenses aren’t required for Cuban nationals as far as the U.S. Government is concerned, Badler speculates that they may not be high priority for OFAC (which is busy dealing with nationals from North Korea, Syria, etc.).

So, then, does that mean more delays for Moncada? Not necessarily, since, as Jeff Passan reported, it sounds like MLB will be meeting with U.S. officials soon to straighten out exactly what is required of them. If that meeting confirms that no specific license is required, then, boom, Moncada is going to be free to sign, and it’s going to be very difficult for the Cubs to have a legit shot at him.  http://www.bleachernation.com/2015/01/29/the-latest-on-yoan-moncada-and-the-government-clearance-mystery/

I think we will try and feature more on the beat reporters on Saunday while we follow both mine and Tom Brennan prospects down to the wire.

Lastly. My family has given me permission to attend all Savannah Sand Gnats home games to the duration of the game. This will give 
me the chance to interview the starts of the games and their coaches.

In addition. I am going to reapproch Jay Howitz (spelling please) and beg for spring training tickets back. My first request will go out tomorrow for pitchers and catchers,

This inactivity is killing me.  No, I really mean it. I think it is killing me and I have to put the spikes back on.

I’ll send my first email to Jay tomorrow. Wish me luck.

Oh… BTW… when do pitchers and catchers report???



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1/30/15

Mack - 2015 Prospect List - #7 – SS – Amed Rosario

7 comments


My rankings is solely subjective and based on nothing more than what is in my head at time I’m writing this. I’ve followed the Mets minor league players for many years and I feel I can recognize talent at various levels of their development. What I have failed at is how to determine when this talent seems to diminish. It’s amazing how many first round picks never make it in this game.

I’m old school, so you won’t seem much SABR-discussion here, I do research and, when I find a good quote or two, I’ll add them to my analysis, but, like I said in the beginning of this post, most of this us subjective.

Let’s get started.

#7 – SS – Amed Rosario – 19-years old – 6-2, 170 – R/R

                       Santa Domingo, Dominican Republic – International free agent signee

                       2013 – Kingsport – 212-AB, .241, .279, .358, 637, 3-HR, 23-RBI

                       2014 – Brklyn-Sav – 296-AB, .274/.320/.372/691, 2-HR, 27-RBI


The Mets signed Rosario in July 2012 with the largest signing bonus in team history ($1.75mil).

Defensively, he’s way ahead of where other 19-year olds play this game. He did have trouble with the game in 2013 with Kingsport, but he’s starting to allow his natural ability take over his game in the field.

Offensively, he’s still learning the game, though his Brooklyn numbers, along with his field play, impressed most scouts that followed this team.


Outlook –


The Mets will not rush Rosario. He’ll return to Savannah… if… Gavin Cecchini returns to St. Lucie, Phillip Evans plays Binghamton, and Matt Reynolds/Wilfredo Tovar play Las Vegas.

I hope the Mets don’t make a mistake here and rush Rosario to St. Lucie. He still has a lot to learn with a bat in his hand.


Rosario projects out to be the best shortstop prospect in the system, but he won’t be ready until 2018 at the earliest. 
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Tom Brennan - Majoring on the Minors: Top 30 Prospects - #7 Akeel Morris

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MAJORING ON THE MINORS: TOP 30 PROSPECTS – # 7 AKEEL MORRIS – Tom Brennan
I’m doing my Top 30 Prospects articles a bit differently – in 2 lists:

·       A top 10 list of lower minors guys who likely won’t show up until 2017 or later.  See list at end of this article.

·       Followed by my top 20 list of guys who are closing in on the big leagues.  Guys who could help in the near future or be trade bait.

Here is the list so far:

20.   Daniel Muno
19.   Michael Fulmer
18.   Miller Diaz
17.   Dario Alvarez
16.   Jayce Boyd
15.   Rob Whalen
14.   Hansel Robles
13.   Gabriel Ynoa
12.   Gavin Cecchini
11.   Jack Leathersich
10.   Cory Mazzoni
9.      Cesar Puello
8.      Matt Bowman

Today, selection #7:

AKEEL MORRIS: I firmly believe Akeel is the real deal, although we may at best only see him as a September call up in 2015.

Here is a guy from St. Thomas who flew to the Dominican for a try out, passed the audition, and chose to sign with the Mets.  A choice to be thankful for. 
After a really rough 2012, he was moved to the pen in 2013 at Brooklyn with remarkable results. Well, not nearly as remarkable as in 2014 in Savannah.  Were it not for one bad pitch (a 3 run homer) he'd have allowed just one earned run the whole season.  Just one.  Five months.  Unheard of.

How about 3 hits per 9 innings?  14 Ks per 9.  Who does that?

Answer: video game characters do…and so does Akeel Morris.

He throws so hard, someone may give him an original nickname like, oh, Mercury Morris. Terrific change up. Fine breaking stuff.  A drive to succeed every outing.  Failure is not an option.  

He was MILB fans' choice for baseball's Minor League Reliever of the Year, so he has those who have seen and believed.

OK, so why did he not get promoted from mid-A Savannah in 2014, Smart Guy? Before I answer that, thank you for being dumb enough to call me smart.  They left him there to convert him to a closer.  He passed the test with flying colors. 

He's "movin' on up" in 2015.  My hope is straight to AA for the 22 year old righty, mid-season to AAA.  Who knows, maybe we see him late 2015.  I hope so.  More gas in a lethal pen.  I'm OK with that. Good luck in 2015, Mr. Morris.

MY TOP 10 LOWER MINORS LIST:
# 1 - Marcos Molina

#2 – Michael Conforto

#3 – Amed Rosario

#4 – Dominic Smith

#5 - Jhoan Urena

#6 – Vicente Lupo

#7 – Wuilmer Becerra

#8 – Luis Guillorme

#9 - Casey Meisner

#10 - Milton Ramos
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