6/8/18

Tom Brennan: METS MINOR LEAGUE HITTING OVERVIEW

3 comments

Tom Brennan: METS MINOR LEAGUE HITTING OVERVIEW


Rather than highlighting individual minor league hitters this week, I am looking at each team's offense (through Tuesday) vs. their league competitors, since their seasons are amazingly already about 40% complete. 


I will not cover pen arms this week.

FULL A COLUMBIA - 14 TEAM LEAGUE:


BA: .239 (12th of 14); league high and low (.275 - .235)

RUNS: 236 (8th of 14); league high and low (283-229)

HRs: 22 (14th of 14); league high (60)

OBP: .324 (4th of 14); league range (.343 - .286)

SBs: 24 (14th of 14); league high 70



HIGH A ST LUCIE - 12 TEAM LEAGUE:

BA: .233 (9th of 12); league range (.283 - .229)

RUNS: 172 (9th of 12); league high (296)

HRs: 19 (11th of 12); league range (44-18)

OBP: .311 (10th of 12); league range (.347 - .300)

SBs: 70 (1st of 12); league low (14)


AA BINGHAMTON - 12 TEAM LEAGUE:

BA: .253 (5th of 12); league range (.277 - .234)

RUNS: 264 (5th of 12); league range (295 - 215)

HRs: 59 (1st of 12); league range below them (57-26)

OBP: .329 (3rd of 12); league range (.354 - .305)

SBs: 16 (12th of 12); league high (55)


Observation: Alonso and McNeil have made this Bingo squad an above average offense. Actually, through Thursday, the duo have combined for 389 at bats, 87 runs, 23 doubles, 3 triples, 29 homers, 89 RBIs, .321.  Impressive.



AAA LAS VEGAS - 16 TEAM LEAGUE:

BA: .257 (12th of 16); league range (.296 - .247)

RUNS: 309 (6th of 16); league range (391 - 229)

HRs: 61 (4th of 16); league range (94-29)

OBP: .331 (10th of 16); league range (.375 - .319)

SBs: 31 (13th of 16); league range (81-18)


Observation: Most of the teams below Vegas in offensive production are playing in lower-scoring eastern hitter-neutral parks, unlike Vegas. 
So there you have it - what do you think?

3 comments:

Reese Kaplan said...

My comment is at the Mets obviously rarely produce anyone who can hit. However, when they do, they don't feel it's appropriate to promote them until they have gray hair.

Mack Ade said...

Good morning Tom:

I am so glad you broke this out, team wise, for our readers. It points out that, once again, team wise, we do not stand up to our competitors.

Thomas Brennan said...

Good comments, guys.

As I see it, every hitter is a bundle of skills that lead to hitting outcomes. The less power that is there, the more that batting average, on base %, and speed are a necessity.

A strong batting average and on base % has to come first - Jeff McNeil is a perfect example, having had over a .300 average and decent speed coming into 2018. Hitters need to get to the early McNeil stage first.

I don't know the answer, except I advocate being aggressive early in counts to help guys get their batting average up and K rate down. Then work more on drawing walks. Then add strength and power.

Trying to hit for power is risky, since a 390 foot fly out is just as much an out as a weak grounder, but for most guys, like former slap hitter Phillip Evans, even if only briefly so far, adding power can get you to the majors, seen in his AAA #'s: 33 doubles, 23 HR. 83 RBI in 611 ABs.

Judging by so many guys with low averages, I wonder if they are being taught to work the pitcher too soon, getting behind in the count, and striking out. I just remember looking at Duda: over a span of years, when he ended an at bat with zero strikes, he was something like a .330/.700 hitter. In 2 strike counts, he hit .160/.300. Swing early, learn to hit, then work your BB rate up.

At least that is how I see it.

The 3 Rockies high average sluggers from the So. Atlantic League that I highlighted in an article recently all had low walk rates, so they were most likely being turned loose early, hacking at good first pitches, with great success.

Success leads to confidence which leads to more success.

Mack's Mets © 2012